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Mobile Learning: The Philosophical Challenges, Problems and Implications of Defining and Theorising

John Traxler

Abstract


This essay uses the popular and perennial topic of definition as a way to explore differing perspectives and expectations amongst the various communities whose interests and activities overlap in what has come to be called mobile learning, and to discuss the role and choice of theory in mobile learning. The purpose of the paper is to add to the academic foundations of mobile learning. These communities continue to make progress and continue also to make mistakes; the researchers continue to provide ideas and examples for practitioners, policy-makers, activists and developers, but often on assumptions, logic and inferences that are not transparent or robust. This is the problem being addressed. Here we seek to add greater critical rigour to the language and expectations being deployed. The essay is by nature not definitive, but seeks merely to expose some of the lack of clarity when mobile learning is discussed and promoted.


Keywords


mobile learning; choice of theory; academic foundations; assumptions; genus; differentia

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.25159/0256-8853/1785

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