Socio-Demographic Variables of Work Engagement, Psychological Capital and Turnover Intention among South African Teachers

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25159/2664-3731/6645

Keywords:

work engagement, psychological capital, turnover intention, socio-demographic variables

Abstract

This study sought to empirically assess whether the socio-demographic variables (age, race, gender, marital status, educational level, years employed, employment status, and home language) of teachers predict their work engagement, psychological capital and turnover intention. A quantitative study was conducted using a non-probability, convenience sampling method on teachers working in the Tshwane South District in Gauteng, South Africa (N = 208). Biographical data were collected. Questionnaires of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Turnover Intention Scale, and Psychological Capital were used in the data collection. The results showed that education qualifications, race, tenure, and the age of high school teachers contribute when explaining their work engagement, psychological capital and turnover intention. The sample was predominantly characterised by African teachers, resulting in the under-representation of other races, and the size of the sample was not large enough to generalise the findings. These findings add valuable knowledge to the body of research and provide new insights that are aimed at enhancing the retention of high school teachers in underdeveloped countries. It is recommended that future research obtain a larger and a more representative sample to increase external validity.

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Author Biographies

Siyamthanda Wendy Mvana, Lecturer

Siyamthanda Wendy Mvana is a lecturer in the Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, UNISA.

Larisa Louw, Industrial psychologist

Larisa Louw is a registered industrial psychologist.

Published

2021-03-25

How to Cite

Mvana, Siyamthanda Wendy, and Larisa Louw. 2021. “Socio-Demographic Variables of Work Engagement, Psychological Capital and Turnover Intention Among South African Teachers”. African Journal of Employee Relations (Formerly South African Journal of Labour Relations) 44 (March):22 pages. https://doi.org/10.25159/2664-3731/6645.

Issue

Section

Articles
Received 2019-07-29
Accepted 2021-03-03
Published 2021-03-25