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Super LED Lamps and Compact Fluorescent Lamps in the Management of Neonatal Jaundice

Patricia O Onianwa, Iyanuoluwa Oreofe Adubi, Temitope O Alonge, Abiodun Jesse Otegbayo, Olaoluwa S Yaya, Olubunmi Victoria Ojo, Funmiso T Ola, Bolaji Oluremi Layemo, Oluwatoyin Rebecca Emiola, Alice Olufunke Mosebolatan

Abstract


Neonatal jaundice is a colossal issue worldwide, particularly in developing countries. About 60 per cent of term and 80 per cent of preterm babies develop jaundice during the first week of life. Approximately 5–10 per cent of all newborns need phototherapy to prevent this commonest morbidity in neonatal life. The commonly used light sources are special blue fluorescent tubes, compact fluorescent tubes and halogen spotlights. In recent years, a new type of light source, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), has been incorporated into phototherapy.


It assessed the significant difference between the baseline total and the level of bilirubin for the first four days of using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and super LED phototherapy lamps. It also examined the significant difference in the responses of male and female neonates to the two intervention methods as well as the significant difference in the median weights of neonates on the day of discharge based on the two intervention methods. The count of the baseline total serum bilirubin when using LED lamps was 11.71 and 8.86 when using CFL lamps. The total serum bilirubin count when using LED lamps decreased from 11.12 to 5.30, and from 9.11 to 6.32 when using CFLs. However, there was no significant difference in the responses of male and female neonates to the two intervention methods and the median weights of neonates on the day of discharge.


Keywords


compact florescent lamp; neonatal jaundice; super light-emitting diode lamp

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.25159/2520-5293/3657