Meanings and understandings of wellbeing : an exploration of Somali refugees' conceptions of human wellbeing

  • Balyejjusa Moses Senkosi Uganda Martyrs University
Keywords: Meaning of wellbeing, Human needs, Somali refugees, Conception of human wellbeing

Abstract

Although there is a substantial body of literature on human wellbeing, there is no universally agreed-upon meaning and understanding of the concept. This article explores the meanings and understandings which Somali refugees in Kampala, Uganda attach to the concept. Drawing on 14 in-depth individual interviews and seven focus group discussions with 70 Somali refugee study participants in Kisenyi, I argue that wellbeing is mainly understood in terms of having access to objective elements that result in having a good or comfortable life. Objective elements can be seen to represent human needs with respect to Doyal and Gough's theory of human need. These objective elements were discussed as prerequisites for having a good life. They include peace and security, health, education, employment and housing. Adequate access to these objective elements is perceived as fundamentally important in promoting and guaranteeing human wellbeing.

Author Biography

Balyejjusa Moses Senkosi, Uganda Martyrs University
Department of Development Studies, Lecturer

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Published
2016-06-07
How to Cite
Senkosi, B. M. (2016). Meanings and understandings of wellbeing : an exploration of Somali refugees’ conceptions of human wellbeing. Africanus: Journal of Development Studies, 45(2), 72-90. https://doi.org/10.25159/0304-615X/684
Section
Articles