‘WE ARE HISTORY IN THE MAKING AND WE ARE WALKING TOGETHER TO CHANGE THINGS FOR THE BETTER’: EXPLORING THE FLOWS AND RIPPLES OF LEARNING IN A MENTORING PROGRAMME FOR INDIGENOUS YOUNG PEOPLE.

Authors

  • Sarah O'Shea Faculty of Social Sciences University of Wollongong
  • Samantha McMahon Faculty of Social Sciences University of Wollongong
  • Amy Priestly Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience, Research Director Sydney, NSW, AUS
  • Gawaian Bodkin-Andrews Centre for the Advancement of Indigenous Knowledges University of Technology Sydney
  • Valerie Harwood Faculty of Social Sciences University of Wollongong

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17159/1947-9417/2016/558

Keywords:

indigenous education, mentoring, indigenous young people, pedagogic flows, youth and learning

Abstract

This article explores the unique mentoring model that the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) has established to assist Australian Indigenous young people succeed educationally. AIME can be described as a structured educational mentoring programme, which recruits university students to mentor Indigenous high school students. The success of the programme is unequivocal, with the AIME Indigenous mentees completing high school and the transition to further education and employment at higher rates than their non-AIME Indigenous counterparts. This article reports on a study that sought to deeply explore the particular approach to mentoring that AIME adopts. The study drew upon interviews, observations and surveys with AIME staff, mentees and mentors and the focus in this article is on the surveys completed by the university mentors involved in the programme. Overall, there seems to be a discernible mutual reciprocity inherent in the learning outcomes of this mentoring programme; the mentors are learning along with the mentees. The article seeks to consider how AIME mentors reflect upon their learning in this programme and also how this pedagogic potential has been facilitated.

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Published

2016-05-13

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Articles