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THE ʽSINGING FREEDOMʼ EXHIBITION: PAINFUL HISTORIES, COLLECTIVE MEMORIES AND PERCEPTIONS OF FREEDOM

Paul Tichmann, Shanaaz Galant

Abstract


This article discusses the research conducted in order to prepare the ‘Singing Freedom:  Music  and  the  struggle  against  apartheid’,  which  was  launched at the Iziko Slave Lodge Museum in Cape Town in March 2014. As part of this research, interviews were conducted with various musicians and other stakeholders involved with 'struggle songs' specifically and freedom songs more generally. The interview questions were informed by the current discourses and scholarship around collective memory and trauma.


Keywords


collective memory and trauma; freedom songs; Singing Freedom project

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References


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