WITCHCRAFT ACCUSATIONS AND THEIR SOCIAL SETTING: CASES IN THE LIMPOPO PROVINCE

  • Thias Kgatla University of Pretoria
Keywords: Witchcraft, Social Theories, Scapegoating, Co-wives, Social Cohesion

Abstract

This article is the result of research findings undertaken in Limpopo Province on the subject of witchcraft beliefs. It is a narration of two villages whose residents were accused of witchcraft and had to be moved to other villages for their safety. Socio-economic conditions responsible for the communities to accuse their members of witchcraft are analysed. In the last part of the paper I draw on some classical theoretical approaches such as projection, scapegoating and materialism theories. In conclusion three statements are considered: 1) witchcraft is something real in human experience; 2) witchcraft is an imaginary crime; 3) an explanation of witchcraft accusations seen through the lens of social theories on society.

References

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Published
2016-01-05
Section
Articles