Human Capital Development and Economic Growth Nexus in Zimbabwe

Keywords: human capital development, nexus, economic growth

Abstract

This study empirically examined the relationship between human capital development and economic growth in Zimbabwe for the period 1980 to 2015, using time series analysis techniques of co-integration, error correction model, and Granger causality tests. The study was motivated by changes which have characterised the financing of human capital since the country attained independence. A decade after independence, the government was able to adequately finance the social sectors; however, thereafter government financing has been declining since the adoption of the structural adjustment programme. The findings of this study indicate the existence of a short-run and long-run relationship between human capital development and economic growth in Zimbabwe. On the direction and significance of the relationship, the result is mixed. Human capital development, proxied by government expenditure on health, had a significant positive impact on economic growth—both in the short run and the long run—reaffirming that a healthy labour force will be more productive and efficient. Human capital development, proxied by government expenditure on education, was found to negatively impact economic growth in the long run. In conclusion, a positive relationship between human capital development and economic growth in Zimbabwe was found, although the relationship is weak.

Author Biographies

Sanderson Abel, Midlands State University

Department of Agricultural Economics and Development 

Senior Lecturer

Nyasha Mhaka, Midlands State University
Department of Economics
Pierre Le Roux, Nelson Mandela University

Department of Economics 

Professor

Published
2019-08-16
Section
Articles