Motion Pictures and the Decline of Cultural Values among Nigerian Youths

Authors

  • Prince Agwu Department of Social Work, University of Nigeria, Nsukka
  • George Nche University of Johannesburg
  • Ngozi Chukwu Department of Social Work, University of Nigeria, Nsukka
  • Malachy Ebue Department of Social Work, University of Nigeria, Nsukka
  • Paul Onuh Department of Political Science

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25159/2708-9355/7019

Keywords:

culture, internet, media, motion pictures, social work, values, youths

Abstract

 

Cultural sustainability, which is a part of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, highlights the imperativeness of intergenerational continuity of cultural heritage, beliefs, and practices among different peoples of the world. It is in this light that our qualitative study examines the impacts on cultural values in Nigeria by both indigenous and foreign motion pictures, and the possible implications for the practice of social work. The study used a cross-sectional survey research design to source data from 48 youths by means of in-depth interviews. The data were analysed thematically in line with a phenomenological research design. The findings showed that indigenous cultural values (language, dress styles, sexual norms, etc.) are threatened, and a preference for Western motion pictures was implicated. However, the participants equally mentioned positive events characterising Western motion pictures, which they recommended that indigenous motion pictures should imbibe. Growing and developing the overall quality of the contents of indigenous motion pictures through enhanced viewers’ preference were discussed to have social and economic values which social workers could help harness.

Published

2021-07-30

How to Cite

Agwu, Prince, George Nche, Ngozi Chukwu, Malachy Ebue, and Paul Onuh. 2021. “Motion Pictures and the Decline of Cultural Values Among Nigerian Youths”. Southern African Journal of Social Work and Social Development 33 (2):20 pages. https://doi.org/10.25159/2708-9355/7019.

Issue

Section

Articles
Received 2019-11-12
Accepted 2021-06-04
Published 2021-07-30